CELL FREE SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY

MEMBRANE PROTEIN ARRAYS

Membrane bound proteins – such as light detecting proteins – are mounted in biomimetic membranes and assembled into an array. Protein function can then be directly interrogated in real time using standard electrophysiology.

Restrepo-Schild et al. Light-Patterned Current Generation in a Droplet Bilayer Array. Scientific Reports volume 7, Article number: 46585 (2017)

Membrane Protein Arrays



Protein on demand

NON-LIVING MATERIALS THAT PRODUCE PROTEIN ON DEMAND

Droplets containing bespoke triggers and DNA can be linked to cell-free expression to produce proteins on demand from a non-living system.

Booth et al. Light-activated communication in synthetic tissues Science Advances Vol. 2, no. 4, e1600056 (2016)

Booth, M.J., Restrepo-Schild, V., Box, S.J., Bayley, H., Light-patterning synthetic tissues with single droplet resolution. Sci. Rep., 7, 9315 (2017)



ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS FROM BIOLOGICAL PARTS

Specific proteins can be used to create networks of droplets that act as conductors of electricity, insulators, diodes, bridges between bilayer membranes.

Images courtesy of Prof Bayley at the University of Oxford

Villar et al. A Tissue Like Printed Material. Science Vol. 340, Issue 6128, pp. 48-52 (2013)

Maglia et al. Droplet networks with incorporated protein diodes show collective properties. Nature Nanotechnology volume 4, pages 437–440 (2009)

Electronic Components From Biological Parts



Artificial cells

ARTIFICIAL CELLS

Cell-like structures made from lipid containing multiple compartments can readily be manufactured with custom chemistry and microfluidics. These can be made stable in physiological environments and hence form a robust chassis for artificial cells.

Images courtesy of OxSyBio and Dr Ollie Castell and the University of Cardiff

Maglia et al. Droplet networks with incorporated protein diodes show collective properties. Nature Nanotechnology volume 4, pages 437–440 (2009)



CELLULAR TISSUES

2D TO 3D TISSUE MODELS

Multiple in – house 3D printing methods – including spheroids, extrusion and droplet
printing – enables simple bridging from traditional 2D models to detailed 3D models and the phenotypic differences that result.

Images courtesy of OxSyBio and Prof Roger Cox at the UK MRC

2D to 3D tissue models



Patient On A Dish

PATIENT ON A DISH

The ability to print with very small volumes opens the possibility of printing patient biopsies or other scarce and expensive engineered cells into miniature tissues for screening applications.



MATRIX CHEMISTRY

Choosing the right matrix is critical to printing 3D structures that do not collapse, as well as achieving good cell growth and differentiation. OxSyBio’s wide range of matrix combinations enables rapid screening for specific cell requirements. Our droplet chemistry approach with very small active printing volumes makes for efficient use of expensive growth factors.

Matrix Chemistry



Automated Standardised Models

AUTOMATED STANDARDISED MODELS

The use of robotic automation enables the rapid generation of cell models into industry
standard 96 well SBS formats as well as customised lab-on-a-chip style flow chambers. This approach enables use of high content imaging for rapid assessment of cellular health and standardisation prior to experimentation.